Employee Engagement Strategies

If you’re still on the fence as to whether or not employee engagement has a real financial impact on your business, or even your department within a business, take one more look at just the low numbers I shared recently… Now it’s time to dig into some things we can each do to start earning engagement from the team members we’re leading!

I don’t care what your title is, you owe it to each person on your team to provide them with clarity about why the work they’re doing matters - who it serves, how it serves them, and why it’s important. Gosh, there are times where I need to do that same thing for Cindy - and she certainly does that for me. 

I can’t think of anyone I’ve ever worked with who’s been willing to give a task everything they have without believing it would make a difference. Without a sense of purpose, why would any of us go the extra mile? But with a clear understanding of how the work I’m doing each...

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How to Improve the Recruitment Process

We’ve recently looked at the importance of recruitment and retention and we’ve dug into some key recruitment and retention strategies. Since much of that was focused on how much getting good at retaining great people can eliminate much of the pressure to fill a position with nearly anyone who has a pulse, we’ll change gears now to key in on how to improve our recruitment process so we’re reaching the right people; the ones who have the most potential to be a great, long term fit in the culture we’re so intentional about creating.

In a session that Cindy and I built called Building Buy-In Around a Clear Mission & Vision, we emphasize how important it is for the leaders in an organization to be extremely specific in detailing how the work that each team member is responsible for ties into to the end product or services the company provides, and just how much impact that has and everyone else it touches. (If you’ve not had a chance to catch that...

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Don’t Make Jack a Dull Boy...

Through the last several posts, we’ve been working through the importance of enjoying each step of the journey rather than resting on the hope that fulfillment will come once we reach that ever so important goal we’re chasing. I even used the last post to share an example of just how badly I’ve failed at doing just that…

In an attempt to be as corny as I can possibly be, I believe the saying may actually be true: All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy!

As I prepared to put this final post together and wrap up this Don’t Wait Until You Get There idea, I found myself thinking about what John Maxwell teaches about the Three R’s in the Law of Priorities: What are we required to do?; What gives us the best return on the time we invest?; and What provides us with the most reward?

Nearly every time I reference these questions, it’s around making the most effective use of our time as leaders. But truth be told, that can often be done with...

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The Why, The What, and The How!

We’ve looked at several things that anyone interested in moving their mission statement from the wall of their front lobby to the actions of their team can take action on. Now let’s remove any remaining confusion there may be between the mission and the vision.

Before digging into this, let me clarify something: I couldn't care any less as to whether we use the right term as long as we’re DOING the right things! I’ve seen organizations waste far more time differentiating which statement is which than their executive team ever invested into living an example for their team members to follow. I suppose they thought that as long as both looked good in a frame, they wouldn’t actually have to change anything they did. I believe we’ve covered that in enough detail so far that we’d be beating the proverbial dead horse to hash it out again…

If we want to truly lead our teams in building a culture that EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS in every aspect of...

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Always Check For Leaks!

Early in chapter 13 of The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, as he’s describing how important it is for a leader to provide a constant example for our teams to follow, John Maxwell says “The temptation for any leaders is to merely communicate about the vision.” Truth be told, just communicating with the team on a regular basis with even a little bit of clarity is still far more effective in gaining buy-in on an organization’s mission and purpose than hanging it on the wall or printing it on ID badges. 

But even frequent communication still presents a challenge; our team may not grasp the full understanding we need them to have from words alone. And without a crisp picture in their minds of how that purpose is achieved, there’s another risk John warns about. He says “vision has a tendency to leak.” 

Clear and ongoing communication about how each individual role ties into our organization’s mission, how it impacts the end...

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Charging Directly Toward The Mission

Before closing the loop with one final thing I’ll challenge you to consider from the mission statement we’ve been looking at, “Delivering customer satisfaction with empowered employees using continuous improvement to get it right the first time, every time,” I want to stress one last time that I’m not suggesting this this particular statement is good or bad. I am, however, challenging you to consider how it relates to the mission statement in your organization, the one you need your team to rally around, and whether or not it provides the kind of clarity they can buy into. If you’re good there, the elephant left in the room is the manner in which you exemplify the behaviors you hope to see throughout your team. And we’ll look at that a bit more over the next few days as we sift through something I read on our flight to Tampa…

A few posts back, I mentioned that I believed the ideas of continuous improvement and right the first time,...

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A Solid Understanding of the Mission Ahead

“Delivering customer satisfaction with empowered employees using continuous improvement to get it right the first time, every time.”

As opposed to the one I shared in the last post, this statement is relatively clear and to the point. For that matter, it’s even fairly simple to understand and isn’t riddled with ambiguity, like value differentiated… On that note, I’d welcome your feedback on how to explain that to an employee to get buy-in… All I can picture when I hear those words is Homer Simpson scratching his head!

While the statement I referenced above is significantly more concise, and far easier to understand, I still don’t think it can stand completely on its own. I also think it’s laden with buzz words with hopes of sounding catchy…

The power in a concise statement like this really comes in how we, as leaders in our respective organizations, provide extreme clarity around each point listed within. What are the...

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Your Mission, Should You Choose To Accept It...

“Our mission is to delight our customers as the number one technology driven global manufacturer and marketer of value differentiated XYZ products and services. We will strengthen our leadership position through a shared-value culture of employee involvement where an intense focus on continuous improvement delivers shareholder value in everything we do.”

In the last LinkedIn article I published, Mission Accepted? Mission Accomplished?, I painted a picture of a mission statement full of big words, printed on fancy paper and mounted in an expensive frame, hanging on the wall in the front lobby of most organizations. Then I challenged anyone reading to consider whether or not anyone other than the first time guest at the location ever paid any attention at all to what it actually said…

The one I sanitized and shared above was not only hanging in one of those really nice frames, it was printed on the back of everyone employee’s ID badge they used to clock in and...

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